The Uproar

For Beto or Worse?

We need more politicians who appeal to our better selves

images collected from google.com

images collected from google.com

Jonathan Ross, Reporter

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In his farewell speech, George Washington warned of the potential dangers of political parties. He believed that the foundation of permanent political parties would undermine the the purpose of being the United States of America, and he was correct. Essentially since our country’s inception, the primary dividing factor in this country has been the bipartisan separation on the issues confronting our society. Our politicians, who are meant to represent the people and the best interests of the country, focus almost solely on the betterment of their party and protection of their own positions. In this way, regardless of race, creed, or political leaning, politicians are largely the same.

However, there are differences in their styles of leadership. There are those who thrive on hate and live for regression and there are those who thrive on positive change and live as an inspiration. As this election cycle rolls around, notice the difference. Notice the difference that relates in no way to political party, but instead relates the politician’s character. Notice the difference that separates career politicians, beholden to their own party, from those who want change. Notice Beto O’Rourke, the Democrat ex-punk-rock band member running for senator of Texas.

Despite the authority politicians can hold, the ability to use this influence derives from the willingness of those under you, not the position itself.”

Over the past few months, Beto has gained recognition on a national scale. This has happened not only because of his quirky air drumming videos in the parking lot of Whataburger and Lebron James’ endorsement, but also because of the record breaking $38.1 million he raised in a single quarter. Seeing as Beto swore off accepting PAC money, the entirety of these moneys came from almost one million separate donors. And if he doesn’t win next Tuesday, each cent of donations will be for naught. Right?

Wrong. While a Democratic senate seat would certainly validate the prolific fundraising numbers Beto has been putting up, he has, regardless of the result, wonnot because of his success in furthering a Democratic agenda, but rather because of his success in establishing a new bar for politicians. He has set an example that can cross into different parties, sectors, and countries. He has remained inspirational.

Beto has been able to set aside many of the defining factors of other politicians—the undying fealty to party policy, hiding being PAC money, and general sliminess—and replace it with his vision of  positive change. Beto and his team have not only expertly managed his rise to stardom, but have also clearly shown the fundamental characteristics that allowed him to do so. These characteristics, of course, are his ability to communicate his opinions clearly and with conviction; acknowledge the opinions of others; and his aspiration for positive societal change. With these, Beto has given people a platform, and a reason, to get involved. In this way, he has managed to transcend politics to set a gold standard for inspirational policy and leadership in all facets of life.

People in positions of power, regardless of their agenda, can take Beto as an example. The nature of this leadership is refreshing, and frankly applicable to everyone: bosses, politicians, principals, parents, or anyone else who tries to impose rules or persuade people to accept their viewpoint. Despite the authority they can hold, the ability to use this influence derives from the willingness of those under you, not the position itself. This willingness is a product of genuine connection and belief that the leader will responsibly evoke change for the betterment of the whole. As Thomas Jefferson wrote in the Declaration of Independence, “Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.”

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2 Comments

2 Responses to “For Beto or Worse?”

  1. Vidhi gipta on November 2nd, 2018 4:45 pm

    This is a biased political article, where is the balance supporting republican policies?

  2. Brendan Werner on November 8th, 2018 9:36 am

    I find this article to be extremely insightful. I have to disagree I don’t think this article is biased to a certain side. This story was written very well.

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